Habitat for Humanity International

Summary

Habitat for Humanity International ("HFHI") is a nonprofit, nondenominational Christian housing organization. They welcome all people to join them as they build simple, decent, affordable, houses in partnership with those in need of adequate shelter. Habitat houses are purchased by the homeowner families. Three factors make Habitat houses affordable to low-income people worldwide: Houses are sold at no profit, with no interest charged on the mortgage. Homeowners and volunteers build the houses under trained supervision. Individuals, corporations, faith groups and others provide financial support. Habitat for Humanity's work is organized at the local level by more than 2,200 affiliates worldwide. Affiliates coordinate house building and select partner families. Homeowner families are chosen according to their need; their ability to repay the no-profit, no-interest mortgage; and their willingness to work in partnership with HFHI.

This organization is a nonprofit. Contributions to it are fully tax deductible to the extent allowed by the law.


Contact information

Mailing address:
121 Habitat St.
Americus, GA 31709-3498

Website: www.habitat.org

Phone: (229) 924-6935

Email: publicinfo@hfhi.org


Organization details

EIN: 911914868

CEO/President: Mr. Jonathan Reckford

Chairman: Mr. Ron Terwilliger

Board size: 31

Founder: Mr. Millard Fuller

Year founded: 1976

Tax deductible: Yes

Fiscal year end: 06/30

Member of ECFA: No

Member of ECFA since:


Purpose

Habitat for Humanity International ("HFHI") is a nonprofit, nondenominational Christian housing organization. They welcome all people to join them as they build simple, decent, affordable, houses in partnership with those in need of adequate shelter.

Habitat houses are purchased by the homeowner families with three factors that make these houses affordable to low-income people worldwide. They are as follows: 1. Houses are sold at no profit, with no interest charged on the mortgage. 2. Homeowners and volunteers build the houses under trained supervision. 3. Individuals, corporations, faith groups and others provide financial support.

HFHI's work is organized at the local level by more than 2,200 affiliates worldwide. Affiliates coordinate house building and select partner families. Homeowner families are chosen according to their need; their ability to repay the no-profit, no-interest mortgage; and their willingness to work in partnership with HFHI.

This organization is a nonprofit. Contributions to it are fully tax deductible to the extent allowed by the law.


Mission statement

Habitat for Humanity International uses the following to express its mission:

The work of Habitat for Humanity is driven by the desire to give tangible expression to the love of God through the work of eliminating poverty housing. Habitat's mission and methods are predominantly derived from three key theological concepts: the necessity of "putting faith into action", the "economics of Jesus" and the "theology of the hammer."

1. Putting Faith Into Action Habitat for Humanity's ministry is based on the conviction that to follow the teachings of Jesus Christ we must reflect Christ's love in our own lives by loving and caring for one another. Our love must not be words only -- it must be true love, which shows itself in action. Habitat provides an opportunity for people to put their faith and love into action, bringing diverse groups of people together to make affordable housing and better communities a reality for everyone.

2. The Economics of Jesus When people act in response to human need, giving what they have without seeking profit or interest, we believe God magnifies the effects of our efforts. Habitat refers to this perspective as "the economics of Jesus." Together, the donated labor of construction volunteers, the support of partner organizations and the homeowners' "sweat equity" make Habitat's house-building possible. By sharing resources with those in need, Habitat volunteers and supporters have made decent, affordable housing a reality for more than 125,000 families worldwide.

3. The Theology of the Hammer Habitat is a partnership founded on common ground -- bridging theological differences by putting love into action. Everyone can use the hammer as an instrument to manifest God's love. Habitat Founder and President Millard Fuller calls this concept "the theology of the hammer," explaining, "we may disagree on all sorts of other things... but we can agree on the idea of building homes with God's people in need, and in doing so using biblical economics: no profit and no interest."

Habitat for Humanity welcomes all people to build with us in partnership. "The Bible teaches that God is the God of the whole crowd," explains Fuller. "God's love leaves nobody out, and my love should not either. This understanding drives 'the theology of the hammer' around the world, steadily building more and more houses in more and more countries."


Statement of faith

Habitat for Humanity has not provided a Statement of Faith. At such time that MinistryWatch receives such, it will be posted on the ministry's profile.

Financial efficiency ratings

Sector: Community Development

CategoryRatingOverall rankSector rank
Overall efficiency rating364 of 42319 of 23
Fund acquisition rating395 of 42322 of 23
Resource allocation rating293 of 42312 of 23
Asset utilization rating253 of 42311 of 23

Click here to read Habitat for Humanity International's response to our ratings


Financial ratios

Funding ratiosMedian % for
all ministries in
MW database
20172016201520142013
Return on fundraising efforts Return on fundraising efforts =
Fundraising expense /
Total contributions
7%20%18%19%16%13%
Fundraising cost ratio Fundraising cost ratio =
Fundraising expense /
Total revenue
6%17%15%16%14%12%
Contributions reliance Contributions reliance =
Total contributions /
Total revenue
95%82%85%85%88%89%
Fundraising expense ratio Fundraising expense ratio =
Fundraising expense /
Total expenses
6%17%17%15%14%11%
Other revenue reliance Other revenue reliance =
Total other revenue /
Total revenue
5%18%15%15%12%11%
 
Operating ratiosMedian % for
all ministries in
MW database
20172016201520142013
Program expense ratio Program expense ratio =
Program services /
Total expenses
83%78%78%80%81%85%
Spending ratio Spending ratio =
Total expenses /
Total revenue
99%98%90%102%94%108%
Program output ratio Program output ratio =
Program services /
Total revenue
81%77%70%82%77%91%
Savings ratio Savings ratio =
Surplus (deficit) /
Total revenue
1%2%10%-2%6%-8%
Reserve accumulation rate Reserve accumulation rate =
Surplus (deficit) /
Net assets
3%3%19%-5%12%-22%
General and admin ratio General and admin ratio =
Management and general expense /
Total expenses
10%5%5%5%4%4%
 
Investing ratiosMedian measure
for all ministries
in MW database
20172016201520142013
Total asset turnover Total asset turnover =
Total expenses /
Total assets
1.300.941.001.211.161.71
Degree of long-term investment Degree of long-term investment =
Total assets /
Total current assets
1.541.331.261.251.161.10
Current asset turnover Current asset turnover =
Total expenses /
Total current assets
2.541.241.261.511.351.89
 
Liquidity ratiosMedian measure
for all ministries
in MW database
20172016201520142013
Current ratio Current ratio =
Total current assets /
Total current liabilities
8.969.112.011.782.032.03
Current liabilities ratio Current liabilities ratio =
Total current liabilities /
Total current assets
0.110.110.500.560.490.49
Liquid reserve level Liquid reserve level =
(Total current assets -
Total current liabilities) /
(Total expenses / 12)
4.078.594.793.474.513.22
 
Solvency ratiosMedian % for
all ministries in
MW database
20172016201520142013
Liabilities ratio Liabilities ratio =
Total liabilities /
Total assets
10%43%40%46%45%45%
Debt ratio Debt ratio =
Debt /
Total assets
0%23%0%0%0%0%
Reserve coverage ratio Reserve coverage ratio =
Net assets /
Total expenses
63%61%60%45%48%32%

Financials

Balance sheet
 
Assets20172016201520142013
Cash$75,566,336$58,104,458$42,751,172$40,495,983$31,668,340
Receivables, inventories, prepaids$82,314,438$93,367,927$88,793,926$103,334,692$99,499,931
Short-term investments$44,642,595$43,852,355$43,097,872$48,985,397$46,247,332
Other current assets$0$0$0$0$0
Total current assets$202,523,369$195,324,740$174,642,970$192,816,072$177,415,603
Long-term investments$0$0$0$0$8,600,000
Fixed assets$6,314,935$7,273,327$7,613,667$7,985,468$9,813,155
Other long-term assets$59,779,005$43,814,383$36,471,055$23,340,000$0
Total long-term assets$66,093,940$51,087,710$44,084,722$31,325,468$18,413,155
Total assets$268,617,309$246,412,450$218,727,692$224,141,540$195,828,758
 
Liabilities20172016201520142013
Payables and accrued expenses$20,860,871$42,694,440$52,626,344$58,790,834$63,869,781
Other current liabilities$1,367,266$54,535,181$45,466,184$36,067,938$23,571,079
Total current liabilities$22,228,137$97,229,621$98,092,528$94,858,772$87,440,860
Debt$61,799,674$0$0$0$0
Due to (from) affiliates$1,547,485$1,868,014$1,773,262$4,934,897$0
Other long-term liabilities$30,275,783$0$0$0$0
Total long-term liabilities$93,622,942$1,868,014$1,773,262$4,934,897$0
Total liabilities$115,851,079$99,097,635$99,865,790$99,793,669$87,440,860
 
Net assets20172016201520142013
Unrestricted$54,246,030$37,555,707$24,648,150$25,342,257$19,277,644
Temporarily restricted$96,053,981$107,301,814$92,059,930$96,852,786$87,743,946
Permanently restricted$2,466,219$2,457,294$2,153,822$2,152,828$1,366,308
Net assets$152,766,230$147,314,815$118,861,902$124,347,871$108,387,898
 
Revenues and expenses
 
Revenue20172016201520142013
Total contributions$211,058,950$232,210,206$218,534,585$242,737,798$277,450,858
Program service revenue$0$0$0$0$0
Membership dues$0$0$0$0$0
Investment income$0$0$0$0($1,240,817)
Other revenue$44,824,727$41,122,180$39,952,256$33,210,086$35,314,152
Total other revenue$44,824,727$41,122,180$39,952,256$33,210,086$34,073,335
Total revenue$255,883,677$273,332,386$258,486,841$275,947,884$311,524,193
 
Expenses20172016201520142013
Program services$196,536,988$191,955,489$211,150,049$211,817,283$284,882,878
Management and general$12,502,016$11,858,765$12,446,537$11,111,892$13,465,761
Fundraising$42,819,266$41,751,631$40,866,224$37,662,679$36,804,463
Total expenses$251,858,270$245,565,885$264,462,810$260,591,854$335,153,102
 
Change in net assets20172016201520142013
Surplus (deficit)$4,025,407$27,766,501($5,975,969)$15,356,030($23,628,909)
Other changes in net assets$1,426,008$686,412$490,000$603,943$0
Total change in net assets$5,451,415$28,452,913($5,485,969)$15,959,973($23,628,909)

Response from ministry

The audited financial statements of Habitat for Humanity International reflect only part of the story of Habitat for Humanity's scope of work around the world. As autonomous nonprofit organizations, Habitat for Humanity affiliates and national organizations keep their own records of revenues and expenditures; those figures are not included in the financial statements of Habitat for Humanity International.

For the fiscal year that ended June 30, 2002, we estimate the entire Habitat for Humanity movement grossed $747.9 million in revenue: 438.2 million in cash contributions and grants, $34.7 million in gifts-in-kind, $237.8 million in sales of houses and $37.2 million in other support. Overall, Habitat for Humanity's estimated expense ratios in FY 2002 were 81 percent program, 10 percent fund raising, and 9 percent management and general expense.


History

Since its founding in 1976 by Millard and Linda Fuller, HFHIl has built and rehabilitated more than 125,000 houses with families in need, becoming a true world leader in addressing the issues of poverty housing.

Koinonia Farm and the Fund for Humanity:
The concept that grew into Habitat for Humanity International was born at Koinonia Farm, a small, interracial, Christian farming community founded in 1942 outside of Americus, Ga. by farmer and biblical scholar Clarence Jordan. The Fullers first visited Koinonia in 1965, having recently left a successful business in Montgomery, Ala. At Koinonia Farm, Jordan and Fuller developed the concept of "partnership housing" -- where those in need of adequate shelter worked side by side with volunteers to build simple, decent houses.

The houses were built with no profit added and no interest charged. Building was financed by a revolving Fund for Humanity. The fund's money came from the new homeowners' house payments, donations and no-interest loans provided by supporters, and money earned by fund-raising activities. The monies in the Fund for Humanity was used to build more houses.

An open letter to the friends of Koinonia Farm told of the new future for Koinonia: "What the poor need is not charity but capital, not caseworkers but co-workers. And what the rich need is a wise, honorable and just way of divesting themselves of their overabundance. The Fund for Humanity met both of these needs. Money for the fund came from shared gifts by those who feel they had more than they need and from non-interest bearing loans from those who could not afford to make a gift but who wanted to provide working capital for the disinherited. . . . The fund will give away no money. It is not a handout."

In 1968, Koinonia Farm laid out 42 half-acre house sites with four acres reserved as a community park and recreational area. Capital was donated from around the country to start the work. Homes were built and sold to families in need at no profit and no interest. The basic model of Habitat for Humanity took form.

Zaire
In 1973, the Fullers decided to apply the Fund for Humanity concept in developing countries. The Fuller family moved to Mbandaka, Zaire (now the Democratic Republic of Congo). The Fullers' goal was to offer affordable yet adequate shelter to 2,000 people. After three years of hard work to launch a successful house building program, the Fullers returned to the United States.

Habitat for Humanity International
In September 1976, Millard and Linda called together a group of supporters to discuss the future of their dream. Habitat for Humanity International (HFHI) as an organization was born at this meeting. The eight years that followed, vividly described in Millard Fuller's book, Love in the Mortar Joints, proved that the vision of a housing ministry was workable. Faith, hard work, and direction set HFHI on its successful course.

Phenomenal Growth
In 1984, former U.S. President Jimmy Carter and his wife, Rosalynn, took their first Habitat for Humanity work trip, the "Jimmy Carter Work Project," to New York City. Their personal involvement in HFHI's ministry brought the organization national visibility and sparked interest in HFHIt's work across the nation. HFHI experienced a dramatic increase in the number of new affiliates around the country.

The Results
Through the work of HFHI, thousands of low-income families have found new hope in the form of affordable housing. Churches, community groups and others have joined together to successfully tackle a significant social problem -- decent housing for all.

Today, Habitat for Humanity has built more than 125,000 houses, sheltering more than 625,000 people in some 3,000 communities worldwide.


Program accomplishments

At the close of FY 2003, Habitat for Humanity was working in 89 nations and had built over 150,000 houses. The organization has 1,673 affiliates in the United States and a total of 2,291 worldwide.


Needs

Habitat for Humanity International has affiliates in all 50 United States, and in every country and province listed on their website at http://www.habitat.org/local/ . If you still have problems finding an affiliate close to you, please email your name and address to publicinfo@hfhi.org or call (229) 924-6935 ext. 2551 or 2552.