Medical Ambassadors International

Summary

Medical Ambassadors International (MAI) is a Christian organization working to impact people around the world by addressing the root causes of poverty, disease, and hopelessness.

We use the strategy Community Health Evangelism (CHE) to partner with God in transforming communities worldwide through fully combining community-owned-development with discipleship.

MAI does not do development for others. Instead we coach locals on CHE principles, who teach CHE to their own communities in some of the world's poorest places. They do development.

Local people own and manage their CHE plans. Medical Ambassadors International provides trainers who bring knowledge and encouragement. Often the villagers use low-tech, low-cost solutions. These plans build on established relationships and focus on preventing problems, as well as promoting spiritual growth.

This organization is a nonprofit, contributions to it are fully tax deductible to the extent allowed by law. It is a member of the Evangelical Council for Financial Accountability (ECFA).


Contact information

Mailing address:
PO Box 1302
5012 Salida Blvd.
Salida, CA 95368-0000

Website: www.MedicalAmbassadors.org

Phone: (209) 543-7500

Email: info@med-amb.org


Organization details

EIN: 942691184

CEO/President: Ravi Jayakaran

Chairman: Steve Belton, M.D.

Board size: 10

Founder: Dr. Ray Benson

Year founded: 1980

Tax deductible: Yes

Fiscal year end: 12/31

Member of ECFA: Yes

Member of ECFA since: 1989


Purpose

Medical Ambassadors International (MAI) is a Christian organization working to impact people around the world by addressing the root causes of poverty, disease, and hopelessness.

We use the strategy Community Health Evangelism (CHE) to partner with God in transforming communities worldwide through fully combining community-owned-development with discipleship.

MAI does not do development for others. Instead we coach locals on CHE principles, who teach CHE to their own communities in some of the world's poorest places. They do development.

Locals are the development workers

  • Electing their own people to be in charge
  • Identifying their own priorities
  • Choosing their own people to be trained
  • Finding their own resources
  • Accomplishing their own goals on their own timeline
Local people own and manage their CHE plans. Medical Ambassadors International provides trainers who bring knowledge and encouragement. Often the villagers use low-tech, low-cost solutions. These plans build on established relationships and focus on preventing problems, as well as promoting spiritual growth.

It does not cost a lot but the demand is overwhelming.

We teach by:
  • Telling Bible stories and stories of what other people have done
  • Triggering participation from the learners
  • Asking questions that lead to discoveries by the learners
  • Asking, "What if...?"
What if the communities don't want to do it themselves?
  • We wait
  • MAI looks for a local champion to step out and say, "I am tired of things being the way they are. Let's do something about it."
  • We go somewhere else. It may seem harsh, but we have seen that handouts only ensure that a community will never be ready to embrace the CHE approach.
CHE works.
  • Malnutrition and death in young children is frequently cut in half, through CHE.
  • People in thousands of places are growing to know Jesus.
  • Through prayer and CHE, churches have been planted or have grown. They have learned to serve their neighbors in ways that make a difference.
  • People are using CHE in over 100 countries around the world that we know.
This organization is a nonprofit, contributions to it are fully tax deductible to the extent allowed by law. It is a member of the Evangelical Council for Financial Accountability (ECFA).

Mission statement

MAI uses the following to communicate its mission:

Equipping communities through Christ-centered health and development


Statement of faith

Medical Ambassadors International subscribes to the following statement of faith:

We believe that the Bible, in its entirety in the original writings, is the inspired, inerrant, infallible and authoritative Word of God.

We believe in one God, eternally existent in three persons; Father, Son and Holy Spirit.

We believe in the deity of our Lord Jesus Christ, in His virgin birth, in His sinless life, in His miracles, in His vicarious death and the atonement through His shed blood, in His bodily resurrection, in His ascension to the right hand of the Father, and in His imminent personal return in power and glory.

We believe that, for the salvation of lost and sinful man, faith in the Lord Jesus Christ provides the only grounds for justification.

We believe in the regenerating ministry of the Holy Spirit by whose power the Christian is enabled to live a godly life.

We believe in the forgiveness of sins, the resurrection of the body and life eternal.

We believe in the spiritual unity of the Church, which is the Body of Christ, composed of all who are regenerated through faith in the Lord Jesus Christ.

We believe in the reality of heaven, hell and satan, which gives urgency to Christ's command to reach all of the world with the Gospel.

Financial efficiency ratings

Sector: Community Development

CategoryRatingOverall rankSector rank
Overall efficiency rating352 of 43016 of 23
Fund acquisition rating348 of 43017 of 23
Resource allocation rating364 of 43018 of 23
Asset utilization rating195 of 4308 of 23

Click here to read Medical Ambassadors International's response to our ratings


Financial ratios

Funding ratiosMedian % for
all ministries in
MW database
20172016201520142013
Return on fundraising efforts Return on fundraising efforts =
Fundraising expense /
Total contributions
7%12%10%9%11%11%
Fundraising cost ratio Fundraising cost ratio =
Fundraising expense /
Total revenue
6%12%10%9%11%11%
Contributions reliance Contributions reliance =
Total contributions /
Total revenue
95%99%100%99%99%100%
Fundraising expense ratio Fundraising expense ratio =
Fundraising expense /
Total expenses
6%11%9%9%10%13%
Other revenue reliance Other revenue reliance =
Total other revenue /
Total revenue
5%1%0%1%1%0%
 
Operating ratiosMedian % for
all ministries in
MW database
20172016201520142013
Program expense ratio Program expense ratio =
Program services /
Total expenses
83%73%77%77%77%77%
Spending ratio Spending ratio =
Total expenses /
Total revenue
99%104%104%100%113%86%
Program output ratio Program output ratio =
Program services /
Total revenue
81%76%79%77%87%66%
Savings ratio Savings ratio =
Surplus (deficit) /
Total revenue
1%-4%-4%0%-13%14%
Reserve accumulation rate Reserve accumulation rate =
Surplus (deficit) /
Net assets
3%-6%-5%0%-15%20%
General and admin ratio General and admin ratio =
Management and general expense /
Total expenses
10%16%14%14%13%10%
 
Investing ratiosMedian measure
for all ministries
in MW database
20172016201520142013
Total asset turnover Total asset turnover =
Total expenses /
Total assets
1.321.441.281.221.231.12
Degree of long-term investment Degree of long-term investment =
Total assets /
Total current assets
1.531.381.381.381.401.36
Current asset turnover Current asset turnover =
Total expenses /
Total current assets
2.531.981.761.681.731.52
 
Liquidity ratiosMedian measure
for all ministries
in MW database
20172016201520142013
Current ratio Current ratio =
Total current assets /
Total current liabilities
9.0913.7215.6222.5426.8730.24
Current liabilities ratio Current liabilities ratio =
Total current liabilities /
Total current assets
0.100.070.060.040.040.03
Liquid reserve level Liquid reserve level =
(Total current assets -
Total current liabilities) /
(Total expenses / 12)
4.075.626.376.846.697.62
 
Solvency ratiosMedian % for
all ministries in
MW database
20172016201520142013
Liabilities ratio Liabilities ratio =
Total liabilities /
Total assets
10%5%5%5%5%5%
Debt ratio Debt ratio =
Debt /
Total assets
0%0%0%0%0%0%
Reserve coverage ratio Reserve coverage ratio =
Net assets /
Total expenses
63%66%74%78%77%85%

Financials

Balance sheet
 
Assets20172016201520142013
Cash$705,235$737,874$818,909$876,140$1,333,244
Receivables, inventories, prepaids$183,030$246,454$235,802$170,781$252,780
Short-term investments$539,946$526,923$519,187$512,252$253,316
Other current assets$0$0$0$0$0
Total current assets$1,428,211$1,511,251$1,573,898$1,559,173$1,839,340
Long-term investments$0$0$0$0$0
Fixed assets$536,290$572,062$593,759$621,608$661,038
Other long-term assets$0$0$0$0$0
Total long-term assets$536,290$572,062$593,759$621,608$661,038
Total assets$1,964,501$2,083,313$2,167,657$2,180,781$2,500,378
 
Liabilities20172016201520142013
Payables and accrued expenses$88,468$79,562$54,218$43,872$47,963
Other current liabilities$15,643$17,183$15,601$14,164$12,859
Total current liabilities$104,111$96,745$69,819$58,036$60,822
Debt$0$0$0$0$0
Due to (from) affiliates$0$0$0$0$0
Other long-term liabilities$0$15,643$32,826$48,427$62,591
Total long-term liabilities$0$15,643$32,826$48,427$62,591
Total liabilities$104,111$112,388$102,645$106,463$123,413
 
Net assets20172016201520142013
Unrestricted$866,844$996,232$1,213,742$1,312,556$1,643,856
Temporarily restricted$993,546$974,693$851,270$761,762$733,109
Permanently restricted$0$0$0$0$0
Net assets$1,860,390$1,970,925$2,065,012$2,074,318$2,376,965
 
Revenues and expenses
 
Revenue20172016201520142013
Total contributions$2,701,955$2,561,228$2,615,809$2,375,652$3,268,517
Program service revenue$0$0$0$0$0
Membership dues$0$0$0$0$0
Investment income$13,086$7,701$10,297$8,998($6,094)
Other revenue$4,068$1,505$5,088$4,931$9,440
Total other revenue$17,154$9,206$15,385$13,929$3,346
Total revenue$2,719,109$2,570,434$2,631,194$2,389,581$3,271,863
 
Expenses20172016201520142013
Program services$2,064,361$2,041,688$2,036,852$2,081,295$2,153,638
Management and general$446,987$373,160$359,923$353,490$271,212
Fundraising$318,296$249,673$243,725$257,443$374,322
Total expenses$2,829,644$2,664,521$2,640,500$2,692,228$2,799,172
 
Change in net assets20172016201520142013
Surplus (deficit)($110,535)($94,087)($9,306)($302,647)$472,691
Other changes in net assets$0$0$0$0($62,178)
Total change in net assets($110,535)($94,087)($9,306)($302,647)$410,513

Response from ministry

90% of the impact of Medical Ambassadors is generated through the efforts of unpaid volunteers, trained directly or indirectly by Medical Ambassadors' paid staff. None of this productive effort shows up on the program side of Medical Ambassadors' audited financial reports. If these volunteers were paid, program/overhead ratios would look very different. However, paying these volunteers would impede both the multiplication and sustainability of programs. Sustainability and multiplication are key element of Medical Ambassadors' impact/overhead ratio. This ratio is much more impressive than the financial figures suggest.


History

Medical Ambassadors International (MAI) was founded by Ray Benson who was a surgeon with a private practice in Billings, Montana. When Ray and his wife, Lou, met Dick Hillis, founder of Overseas Crusade, the vision of this organization appealed to Ray and he began traveling with Dick on Overseas Crusade mission trips.

In 1973, Ray sold his surgery clinic and moved to Vietnam with his family where they served under the auspices of Overseas Crusade. It was at this time that the title, Medical Ambassadors, was adopted by Ray as a counterpart to Overseas Crusade's Sports Ambassadors. After a harrowing, last-moment helicopter evacuation from Vietnam at the close of the war, the Bensons moved to the US and began the ministry of Medical Ambassadors. Their vision at this time was to assist nationals in integrating a spiritual ministry with the physical ministry of health care.

In 1980, MAI became an independent mission with ministries in the Philippines and Latin America. In 1984, ministries were begun in India, soon followed by Nepal and Bangladesh. In 1988, founder Raymond Benson asked Paul Calhoun, MD, to take over the leadership of the mission as executive director. Paul gave up his dermatology practice to become a part of the organization and works fulltime without taking salary or benefits from the mission, choosing to support his family from investments made while practicing medicine.

Eventually, it was in Africa in 1988 that Dr. Calhoun discovered the "better way." In God's providence he heard reports of work being conducted in Uganda by a man named Stan Rowland.

Stan's approach was to set up a simple learning system whereby individuals chosen by community or village leaders were taught how to deal with basic health care issues. These were matters Westerners would probably take for granted--lessons about basic hygiene, for instance, keeping yourself and your children clean, purifying drinking water, digging latrines, and so on.

The genius of this approach was that the education could be replicated at the grass-roots level. Instructors teach learners who become instructors who teach learners who become instructors who teach learners--well, you get the idea.

Certainly there were still physical needs requiring professional medical attention--clinics and hospitals continue to be essential. However, the vast number of people in the lines seeking help could now be dealt with at the community level--as many as 70 to 80 percent.

Stan Rowland is considered to be the father of what has become known around the world as Community Health Evangelism. (Community Health Evangelism around the world is popularly referred to as CHE) Seamlessly woven into the teaching are basic biblical truths of evangelism: Christ is the healer of hearts and bodies, our value comes from God, His Spirit lives in us and makes us whole, cleanliness begins in the heart and mind.

From these conjunctions, Medical Ambassadors International became the organization that incubated the growth of the international CHE movement. Tirelessly, its health practitioners integrated into their lessons a profound understanding of healing the world Christ's way. The work of MAI is now accomplished by trained individuals in villages and urban slums going from home to home teaching others how to be responsible for their own preventive health care. Instead of white and Western "experts," these new faces are now predominately multi-cultural and multi-ethnic.


Program accomplishments

  • Have trained many other organizations - 600 directly or people trained by people we've trained
  • We freely give away our expertise to other organizations
  • CHE Curriculum Search Engine by MAI for 12,000 lessons
  • Ongoing lesson development and field testing
  • Development of curriculum specific to meet the needs of women, children, and men with Women Cycle of Life, Children's CHE, and Men Matter
  • Working/consulting/developing programs in over 100 countries
  • Over 50,000 volunteers worldwide
  • Small headquarters staff so donations are used globally
  • Churches planted all over the world

Needs